Bangladeshi Tiger IT to ensure security of vehicles in Nepal

Many renowned international vendors participated in the project’s tendering process in January 2016, and Decatur-Tiger IT was selected as the most compliant and innovative solution

Tiger IT, a Bangladesh-based global production and identity management solutions leader, has opened a new factory for producing digital retro-reflective number plates at Kathmandu, Nepal. These number plates will be installed in vehicles in Nepal – to protect them from being stolen, and keep a tab on their location, identification information, etc.

Nepal Physical Infrastructure and Transport Minister Bir Bahadur Balayar inaugurated the factory on August 21. The minister along with other high officials made number plates for themselves at the inauguration.

Tiger IT will produce around 2,500,000 high security digital number plates that will be installed in vehicles within five years at the cost of $43.7 million – making this one of the top technology projects in Nepal.

Nepal Department of Transport Management (DoTM) has signed a deal with Decatur-Tiger IT, a joint venture consortium to implement the project on May 30, 2016.

Many renowned international vendors participated in its tendering process in January 2016, and Decatur-Tiger IT was selected as the most compliant and innovative solution.

Previously, the Bangladeshi IT giant provided nearly 3,100,000 digital registration number plates to Bangladesh Road Transport Authority (BRTA) under a joint venture with Bangladesh Machine Tools Factory. Tiger IT provided solutions for national identity cards and voter registration in Bangladesh in 2008. They also provided smart license card solution to the BRTA.

“It is a great achievement for us to get such a project. We have successfully provided digital number plates to the Bangladesh transport authorities which has helped us to get this project,” said Rajib Choudhury, assistant general manager of Tiger IT.

The number plates made by Tiger IT will be installed in vehicles in Nepal – to protect them from being stolen, and keep a tab on their location, identification information, etc Dhaka Tribune

The number plates made by Tiger IT will be installed in vehicles in Nepal – to protect them from being stolen, and keep a tab on their location, identification information, etc Dhaka Tribune

“We will provide nearly 2,500,000 digital number plates with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags within five years which will strengthen security and monitoring system in Nepal’s transportation process,” he added.

However, establishing a factory in Nepal was not an easy task because of the country’s political unrest.

“It was challenging for us to build a factory in Nepal as a foreign vendor because of its political crisis. Meanwhile, we are required to train the staff for smooth operation,” said Goutam Bhattacharya, chief operating officer of Tiger IT, in Delhi, India.

He told the Dhaka Tribune: “We have installed latest technology in our factory to provide world standard service. No one can duplicate these number plates because of the unique serial numbers in the stickers.”

“We can provide specific data on transport movement to the government that can help them draft a proper plan for maintaining smooth traffic management,” he added.

Tiger IT will provide nearly 2,500,000 digital number plates with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags within five years which will strengthen security and monitoring system in Nepal's transportation process Dhaka Tribune

Tiger IT will provide nearly 2,500,000 digital number plates with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags within five years which will strengthen security and monitoring system in Nepal’s transportation process Dhaka Tribune

The Nepal government had earlier provided its people machine readable passports which were also made by Tiger IT.

After its establishment in 2000, Tiger IT has become popular by producing an identification software. In the last 17 years, they have worked in around 18 countries of the world. They currently have offices in the US, UK and Poland apart from Dhaka.

Through their new project, each vehicle owner in Nepal will get two embossed digital plates with an RFID stickers.

The consortium has already started producing the number plates.

Michel Goffin, president of Decatur Industries, told the Dhaka Tribune: “The digital number plates will have microchips that could identify the vehicles, obtain information of their location, maintain their digital records, and even protect them from being stolen.”

Source: Dhaka Tribune

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