A raw deal from a friendly neighbour

Abdul Hannan

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That Foreign minister Dipu Moni would return home empty handed after her visit to Delhi was a foregone conclusion, given the mind set of Indian leaders and its internal dynamics of politics. With Indian general election round the corner, any thought of an immediate shift of Indian stance is a delusion. Once bitten twice shy. By all indications, Prime minister’s September Delhi visit may not be anything more than exchange of pleasantries which will only add to the discomfort of her government and humiliation to the nation. The failed overtures to India to clinch deals in favour of Bangladesh has almost certainly caught the government on the wrong foot and may cast a lengthening shadow over the forthcoming election prospects of the party in power.

The euphoria and exuberance expressed by our leaders over assumed resolution of long festering border and Teesta river water sharing disputes with India has now dissipated into deep dismay and disenchantment. Yet, it was not entirely unexpected. The great expectation about the result of talks brokered by the two advisers and confirmed by two prime ministers was a wild goose chase and a cry in wilderness. The implementation of the agreements floundered on the rock of known Indian track record of bad faith, breach of promise .

Yet, Bangladesh does not deserve such a raw deal. This views were echoed by no lesser persons than four distinguished former Indian diplomats posted in Dhaka. Dev Mukherjee, Ranjeet Mitter, Veena Sikri and Muchkund Dubey, former Indian High commissioners in Dhaka said recently in course of an interview with Delhi correspondent of Protham Alo and discussions in Rajya Sabha television that Bangladesh during last four and half years addressed and took care of many Indian concerns including security and India should have reciprocated the gesture by way of living up to its promise on Teesta water sharing and border demarcation agreements. They reiterated the responsibility of India to improve relations with Bangladesh.
Apparently, duped by India’s grandiose presence and attracted by its charm offensive, this government, in good faith, conceded to every Indian concern, every agenda, one after another, without getting any thing in return. It has fully cooperated with India on ‘transfer of sentenced persons, zero tolerance to insurgent
Source: Weekly Holiday

One Response to A raw deal from a friendly neighbour

  1. Bangladeshis should have been disillusioned about India’s sincerity and honesty in keeping promises. If it had been as it should have been India won’t have to suffer partition. Many in this country love to see and know Mr. Jinnah demonized and the only point is that he said that Urdu would be the state language of Pakistan. But leaving it aside, nobody says that it was not Jinnah but Patel who raised the two nation theory for the first time saying, ‘Admit or not, it’s undeniable that there are two nations, (Hindus and Muslims) in India. The track record of breaking promises by India is not new. It’s almost over a century old. Now those who are very much optimistic about the real good intention if India should answer a few questions: a. Why after Mujib-Indira agreement Banglash relinquished it ownership of Berubari without getting Tinbigha corridor and other enclaves in return so hastily? b. Why does a section of our intelligentsia is so kowtowed to India for their help when the million dollar worth weaponry abandoned by/captured from the occupation army was taken away by India? And what about the Rs=1000 crore annual expenditure to maintain her Eastern Command was no longer remained necessary as Bangladesh had become a friendly country?

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